deimos-remus:


100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #8

Charles Dana Gibson (1867-1944)

Country: United States

Famous for: The Gibson Girl, LIFE, Harper’s Weekly, Scribners, Colliers

Influenced: Andrew Loomis, Alberto Vargas, Gil Elvgren, James Montgomery Flagg

Influenced by: Howard Pyle, Charles Keene, Phil May

Charles Gibson is at the forefront of masters of the medium of Pen & Ink, creating thousands of loose, but controlled ink illustrations for various publications. Gibson is most well known for creating the Gibson Girl, an iconic representation of the attractive, well-to-do, independent woman at the turn of the 20th century. The Gibson Girl became a country-wide phenomenon, and was stamped onto everything from magazines, to dishes and clothing. With the constant profit Gibson made from his creation, he became one of the most monetarily successful commercial illustrators to ever live.

deimos-remus:


100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #6

Frederic Remington (1861-1909)

Country: United States

Famous for: Western life, Cowboys, Native Americans, Landscapes, US Cavalry

Influenced: Charles Marion Russell, Charles Schreyvogel, Frank Frazetta

Influenced by: Charles Rollo Peters, James McNeill Whistler

Frederic Remington was an American painter, Illustrator, Sculptor and Writer that made a career out of his depictions of the American West. Much of what he painted, he painted from direct observation of his subjects. Like Winslow Homer, Harper’s Weekly Magazine sent Remington on commissions to cover different events as an artist-correspondent. Though younger and less-established than many of the other illustrators at the time, Remington gained quick popularity and was a competitor to the era’s most popular artists, such as Howard Pyle, Winslow Homer, and Charles Dana Gibson

deimos-remus:

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #5

Winslow Homer (1836-1910)

Country: United States

Famous for: Maritime paintings, Civl War illustrations, City life, Harper’s Weekly Magazine

Influenced: Howard Pyle, N.C. Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, Jamie Wyeth

Influenced by: William Sydney Mount,Eastman Johnson, Thomas Eakins

Winslow Homer was an American painter and illustrator, most well known for his paintings of seascapes, but his other big claim to fame was when he was asked by Harper’s Weekly Magazine to work as a reporter to a degree on the front-lines of the American Civil War. This was before photography had really become popular, as Homer would sketch and paint the soldiers from life, as he saw them. These paintings and drawings would be then published in Harper’s Weekly, so as to give the American public an accurate look at life during wartime. After his work during the war, he would go on to paint images of home-life, and how the war affected it, specifically the lives of women and their changing roles. 

johnnythehorse:

Jean Giraud

johnnythehorse:

Jean Giraud

deimos-remus:

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #4

Thomas Nast (1840-1902)

Country: United States

Famous for: The Republican Elephant, Boss Tweed and Tammany Hall political cartoons, Harper’s Weekly magazine

Thomas Nast was a political cartoonist and caricaturist, and is considered to be the ‘Father of the American Cartoon.’ His work became the basis for all political cartoons that would follow, and is well known for his subtle brand of dark humor. This is in addition to creating the now iconic Elephant representation for the Republican party and the basis for what became the modern day Santa Claus. Adding onto this still is the fact that the popularity of Nast’s illustrations were widespread enough to influence public perception, political elections and political policy. 

deimos-remus:

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #3

N.C. Wyeth (1882-1945)

Country: United States

Famous for: Treasure Island, Robinson Crusoe, Robin Hood, Kidnapped, The Last of the Mohicans

Newell Convers Wyeth was an American Illustrator, and perhaps Howard Pyle’s most well-known student. Over his long and influential career, Wyeth produced over 3000 paintings and illustrated 112 books, including his magnum opus, a portfolio of paintings done for Robert Louis Stephenson’s classic adventure novel, Treasure Island. Like Gustave Doré’s demons and creatures, NC Wyeth and Howard Pyle’s depictions of Pirates, Buccaneers and Adventurers became the staple images for their respective genres, images that have now become stereotypes. Pyle, Wyeth and Wyeth’s talented family, Including his son Andrew Wyeth and grandson Jamie Wyeth, have become collectively known as the Brandywine River Painters, named after the area from which they resided for much of their lives. Much of their original work, including many of NC’s Treasure Island images currently reside in the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, PA. I was recently able to give the museum a visit, and the inspiring work there almost had me in tears. I recommend a visit to anyone who can make the trip. 

deimos-remus:

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #2

Gustave Doré (1832-1883)

Country: France

Famous For: Dante’s Inferno, Milton’s Paradise Lost, Bible Illustrations, Perrault’s Fairy Tales, Don Quixote. 

Gustave Doré was a French printmaker, Illustrator, painter and sculptor. He is known for his ultra-detailed engravings, of which he had a crew of engravers to help him with, as his portfolios of images often consisted of hundreds of plates. Doré’s work is still in print to this day in many versions of the books and stories he illustrated, and is accredited with creating many of the now stereotypical images of various demons and monsters. 

deimos-remus:

I’m going to be putting together a series of blog posts concerning 100 influential and prolific illustrators that I believe every illustrator should know. These will not have any specific order of importance. Please REBLOG these posts to get these names out there, known and appreciated!

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #1

Howard Pyle (1853-1911)

Country: United States

Famous for: The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, King Arthur, Pirates, Harper’s Weekly

Howard Pyle is considered by many to be the father of American Illustration, and had a long-lasting and prolific career creating illustrations for fantasy and adventure stories. He founded the Howard Pyle School of Illustration Art, later coined the Brandywine School named after the area several of his most well-known students were from. Among his most notable students were N.C Wyeth and Frank Schoonover. Along with his students, he is considered part of the collective known as the Brandywine River Artists, and his work remains in museums throughout the country. 

Frank Frazetta vs. Mike Hoffman

I recently visited the Frank Frazetta Museum in East Stroudsburg, PA. It was an incredible experience being able to look at the master’s work up close, but even more amazing to listen to the first hand experiences of Frank Jr and his memories of his father.

I was talking to Frank Jr. when the subject of Mike Hoffman came up. For those of you who don’t know, Hoffman has made his career imitating the style Frank Frazetta, everything from painting, drawing, very specific subject matters, and even his signature. Of course, no one imitating Frazetta’s style will ever be better than Frazetta himself. In fact, Frank himself has a good quote to address this:

“Why be a second-rate Frazetta when you be can be a first-rate you?” -Frank Frazetta

Frank Jr, however, let me know that Mike Hoffman had been invited to the gallery years back. Knowing that his own work would never compare to the late master, Mike Hoffman has made a crusade to undermine the work of the actual artist who’s responsible for his own success.

This BS is copied from a blog entry of his, that has since been deleted.

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY I’M BETTER THAN FRANK FRAZETTA

1. When I say I don’t use photographs, I’m not lying.

2. When I say I don’t swipe, I’m not lying.

3. I don’t go around claiming criminals like Richard Nixon were great presidents.

4. I don’t go to Rush Limbaugh for intellectual guidance.

5. I don’t publish art books that have paintings of my wife’s big naked ass in them.

6. When younger artists ask for technical advice, I don’t say “don’t try to be like me”.

7. I don’t build museums to myself in my backyard.

8. I don’t pretend to have invented Art all by myself, ignoring everything that came before.

9. I don’t pretend Hal Foster never existed.

10. Because my ambition and drive is the result of undemonstrative father doesn’t mean I became one myself.

11. When my work inspires others, I take paternal responsibility for it.

12. I don’t fault my kids for not following in my footsteps when I didn’t prepare them for it.

13. I don’t refer to myself as “The Legend”.

What a twat. I know nothing about the political views of Frazetta, and of course, those points have no relevancy, but according to the personal testimony and remembrances of Frank Jr. regarding his father, none of these insults hold any water. Frank was and is a legend, that much is true, but he was a humble man, didn’t push his kids into his career choice, nor did he berate them for not choosing it,  and saw his wife Ellie as his muse, who loved his paintings and loved to be painted.

This guy is a total hack and fraud, a skilled but unimaginative artist with no respect, and thus totally undeserving of any himself. I don’t want to make the world harder for artists, it’s plenty hard enough, but I want this to get reblogged so people are aware of how terrible this guy is.

siryl:

At the end of your life you will be judged by these two.

nxghtmvre:

Akira (1988)

nxghtmvre:

Akira (1988)

tohellwithbaberuth:

What’s better than any single issue released this week? 
http://www.grenadeamok.com/#/new-gallery/

tohellwithbaberuth:

What’s better than any single issue released this week? 

http://www.grenadeamok.com/#/new-gallery/

fantagor:

"I’ve always loved horror anthologies set in the fifties. If I did one it would probably have a title like THE STENCH OF THE GRAVE!. It would be hosted by Mag the Hag and it would look something like this.” - Richard Corben

nealdanderson:

Pirate Chest.

nealdanderson:

Pirate Chest.

nealdanderson:

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